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On this blog we will track down the latest Amazon Kindle news. We will keep you up to date with whats hot in the bestsellers section, including books, ebooks and blogs... and we will also bring you great Kindle3 tips and tricks along with reviews for the latest KindleDX accessories.

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September 2016
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The Litigators by John Grisham

John Grisham’s books usually start out pretty boring, but as you keep reading, the plot picks up speed, and has you holding your breath until the last page.  He is well known for courtroom thrillers, but has also deviated from that genre with A Painted HouseSkipping Christmas, and a few others.

Many people say that his first novel, A Time to Kill was his best, and I agree that his earlier ones were the ones to beat.  He kind of lost his edge in the past few years, but regained his momentum with The Associate, and most recently, The Litigators.

The Litigators has been on top of the Kindle Bestseller list for months.  It is your typical Grisham courtroom thriller.  Finley & Figg is a seedy, run of the mill law firm in Chicago that handles small cases.  The firm is constantly searching for the fastest ways to make money without actually doing much work.  Finley & Figg hits jackpot, or at least they think they do, with a case involving a company under fire for its weight loss drug.

What seems too good to be true usually is, and the “easy money” often has big strings attached.

Here’s what the reviewers are saying:

Jim

“Spot on with caricatures of mas s tort bar and big firm defense. Nice pace and crescendo of anticipation. Fantastic intro to trial procedure and strategy for non-lawyers with plenty of substance to keep lawyers interested. ”

This is what I’m always thinking when I read a Grisham book…

Talutsa

“A usual John Grisham book. It is always interesting to find out how his characters get out of the predicaments in which they find themselves. There is a side story to this that turns out to be more important to the lead character than the one that starts the book. “