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On this blog we will track down the latest Amazon Kindle news. We will keep you up to date with whats hot in the bestsellers section, including books, ebooks and blogs... and we will also bring you great Kindle3 tips and tricks along with reviews for the latest KindleDX accessories.

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September 2016
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Macs Get Send-to-Kindle Option

It hasn’t been all that long since we first saw the release of the Send-to-Kindle program for the PC, but it has already proven to be a huge improvement to the Kindle’s functionality for many users.  Not only does it make things like exporting DRM-free eBooks from Calibre that much easier (nobody likes having to find their USB cable, assuming they even have one), the ability to print from practically any window directly into a Kindle document makes life a lot easier.  Now Mac users will get to experience the same benefits, thanks to Amazon’s newest software release.

If you are a Mac user and have an interest in taking advantage of this new feature, head over to this page on the Amazon.com site and download the application.  The installation is simple and will result in having a “Send to Kindle” icon sitting in your dock.  Any time you want to send something to your Kindle, you can simply drag and drop the document into the dock icon.  Multiple simultaneous documents are acceptable as well, of course.

If you want to send something active to the Kindle, perhaps a web page or working document from Word, the Send to Kindle application also includes the same sort of “printer drivers” that the PC version makes available.  Simply print as you normally would, choosing “Send to Kindle” as your device of choice.  The same window will appear that you see when dragging document icons into the dock.

This window offers a few useful options.  Most importantly, you get to tag your document with both Title and Author metadata.  This means that it is not important to worry about file naming prior to transfer.  One less hassle.  You also get to decide on delivery options.  You can choose to have your documents sent via Wi-Fi or Whispernet.  If you choose Whispernet, the usual charges will apply and as such it is usually preferable to avoid it.  You also get to decide which Kindle or Kindles get access to the document being sent.  This can be everything on your account, just your smartphone’s Kindle for iOS app, or any combination in between.

You also get the option of archiving your document in your account’s Kindle Library.  This is particularly handy and may get used more often than you expect.  While each account only gets 5GB of free storage space, this does not generally fill up quickly when it is used primarily for document storage.  This means that anything you think might be handy to have available can be stored in the cloud even when it is not worth the trouble of keeping on your Kindle itself at any given time.  I find myself frequently using this function even when I have no reason to need an immediate transfer to the Kindle.

So far we lack any information about a possible “Send to Kindle for Linux” option.  That would seem to be the next big step if another were to be take.  Given Amazon’s enthusiasm for Linux as a platform, it might be a fairly long wait.  It is definitely nice to see Kindle eReader and Kindle Fire functionality continuing to be expanded and made available to the largest possible audiences, however, and we can only anticipate the trend continuing as Kindle eBook prices drop in the near future.

Kindle Fire Sets New Tone For Tablet Industry

So, the big news has finally broken and we now know all there is to know about the new Amazon Kindle Fire Tablet.  If anything, it exceeds much of the high expectation surrounding the initial hype.  Everything from the drastic undercutting of competition pricing to the well thought out theme of the interface seem calculated to dominate a currently scattered industry.  With something like this available, even the iPad might have more to worry about than previously expected. That said, there are some other things going on here that aren’t entirely apparent at first glance.

A couple things go a long way to guaranteeing that Kindle Fire customers will remain Amazon customers as long as they own their device, for example.  For one, while nothing says that you definitely cannot import content from other sources, and indeed it seems almost inevitable that you will be able to do so, the integrated storage is fairly limited and only Amazon content will be given unlimited storage space on their cloud servers.  Will it be possible to stream content, especially video, over your home network to the tablet?  That remains to be seen.

We also have to assume that a great deal of the functionality, as far as content access and even web browsing go, would be lost with the rooting of the device for whatever reason.  Amazon has been concerned enough with piracy in the past to make this something they will have taken into consideration, even if it means that some legitimate users will be inconveniences by it.

For your average user, still not really a bad deal.  You have access to movies, music, magazines, and even books, all at a reasonable price.  The Amazon Prime functionality becomes almost mandatory to get the most out of things, but it provides value far beyond its cost. Kindle Fire’s even light enough for one-handed use and can multi-task enough to play you music while you read or browse the web.

What would have made it even better?  In the future people are definitely hoping for a larger viewing area, expandable storage, optional 3G capabilities, and longer battery life.  Some of that fell to the side in order to allow the Kindle Fire to be priced so low.  Some of it, like the battery life, just isn’t reasonable yet.  Of course if we’re speculating about hardware that does not exist yet then I suppose full color, low power, non-backlit displays would be nice.  These things will happen when the tech is available, I would assume.  Better to do it right with what is mature right this minute than jump in too soon.

Should this take off, and I think we can all be pretty sure that it will after today’s reveal, expect to be seeing a larger, more powerful Kindle Tablet on the horizon.  Amazon supposedly spent time and manpower getting a 10″ tablet designed already, and they’ll need it to top this offering.  The competition will need some time to adjust, in the meantime.  It’s unlikely we’ll see such an affordable yet functional tablet from anybody else in the near future.