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On this blog we will track down the latest Amazon Kindle news. We will keep you up to date with whats hot in the bestsellers section, including books, ebooks and blogs... and we will also bring you great Kindle3 tips and tricks along with reviews for the latest KindleDX accessories.

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September 2016
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How Much Do You Have To Read For The Amazon Kindle To Be Worth Buying?

There are any number of reasons to pick yourself up a Kindle, from convenience of transportation to instant 24-hour delivery of all new book purchases, but let’s take it down to the basics for a moment.  Assuming that you have absolutely no concern besides the direct tradeoffs with paper, how much do you have to read before your Kindle has justified itself?

Pricing

We’ll make the somewhat depressing assumption that you read nothing but current bestsellers.  I sincerely hope this isn’t the case, of course, but it makes the price estimation easier for me and negates the obvious point of free books that you should already be aware save you money.  Looking through the top 15 bestselling new hardcover book releases in the Amazon.com store(not the Kindle Store since that might indicate a customer predisposition toward discounted books), there are 13 books that the Kindle saves money on, one where the price is even based on pre-order discounting, and one book that is not available in Kindle format.

The actual average savings on those books that are available is around $2.47(ranging from $0.98 to $5), but for the sake of argument we can round it down to $2.  Always better to err on the side of caution.  This means approximately 58 Kindle books purchased during the life of your Kindle device before it has saved you money, if you pick up the $114 Kindle WiFi w/ Special Offers.  Now, I’m aware that reading five books per week is abnormal so my average doesn’t really play into this.  For the sake of argument, it seems safe to assume a conservative pattern of finishing a book every two weeks.  That would mean that you have to own a Kindle for a little over two years before it saves you any money, assuming this level of consumption and no taking advantage of special offers or hunting for savings.  Not unreasonable, if perhaps more than some would like.  These things do work pretty much forever if you take care of them.  It also might be worth knowing that Kindle owners are said to buy books at more than three times the rate of paper book customers, which speeds things up a bit.

Impact

Another major concern that has come up before is the environmental impact of eReading.  While there is definitely a lot more that goes into the manufacture of an eReader like the Kindle than ever would in a paper book, there is more than that to take into account. Between production, transportation, storage, shipping, and all the other associated fuel costs, each book creates a noticeable amount of pollution.  The question is where these numbers cross over.

Last year, in reference to Kindle 2 production, a report came out on the impact of producing Kindles compared to that of books which said that a Kindle creates a bit over 20 times as much pollution as a book in its creation.  You could always assume that Amazon has gotten more efficient in their production with the next generation of the device, improved processes being good at that sort of thing, but let’s ignore that speculation and focus on what numbers we actually have.  Round that first estimation up to 30 books worth if you want to account for the impact of charging your Kindle and I would be willing to bet that there are still very, very few people ever to own an eReader who didn’t manage to offset these totals.

Putting aside used books and libraries, since if you buy used books then you already know the advantages and the interaction between libraries and Kindles is in flux at the moment and hard to judge in the long term, picking up a Kindle, or any eReader, is just generally a good long term investment for you and the planet.

Happy Earth Day!

eaarthI found a selection of Kindle books that feature green topics such as green living and food and diet that are featured just in time for Earth Day on April 22.  It is good to celebrate Earth Day especially with the trends going towards sustainability and environment issues.

Named one of the best books of April, 2010, Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet by Bill McKibben, is an intense look into climate change, and a totally different view of the Earth we’ve always known.

We’ve been hearing how we’re close to the point of no return as far as global warming is concerned, but that there is still time to fix it.  Well, Eaarth says we’ve already passed that point.

AIROLF

“McKibben describes a place so strikingly different from the planet Earth we have always known, that it has to be renamed to “Eaarth.” McKibben’s writing is easy to read and his ideas are clear, but his thesis is overwhelming to any reader: “The earth that we knew–the only earth that we ever knew–is gone.” (pg 25) At times, reading the book is similar to the experience of watching a carwreck – it’s heart-wrenching but you can’t force yourself to look away. ”

After reading the reviews of The Gorgeously Green Diet, it actually makes me want to give it a try.  This book provides easy to read recipes and is written in a style that you can relate to.  Often I pick up “easy” cookbooks only to find that they are still difficult to understand.  This is not the case with Sophie Uliano’s latest cookbook.

“In her relatable, girlfriend-to-girlfriend tone, Uliano pledges that anyone can go green and lean, no matter where they live or what resources they have. Uliano recognizes that dieting and going green are big lifestyle changes and makes it easy for readers to commit to both by allowing them to personalize their plans according to their needs. The book has three diet plans-light green, bright green and deep green- that depend on how much time, travel, and money readers want to commit to going green. The three plans promise the same amount of weight loss, but the darker green the plan is, the greater the commitment the reader makes to reducing waste, going organic and staying carbon neutral. ” – Amazon

Living Like Ed: A Guide to the Eco-Friendly Life is written by Ed Begley, someone who has actually put what he’s written into practice for 30 years.  That adds a lot of credibility to what he has to say.  He provides suggests that go from unplugging unnecessary electronics, to purchasing solar panels.  So, you can choose to make small changes or invest in much longer ones.

Well come to think of it, by owning a Kindle, we’re doing our own part to help save trees and reduce paper…

The Nation for Kindle

The Nation is available on the Kindle for a good deal at $1.49 a month.  It is a weekly, mostly text based magazine.  The reviews are favorable and say that the Kindle version is easy to navigate.

The Nation will not be the organ of any party, sect, or body. It will, on the contrary, make an earnest effort to bring to the discussion of political and social questions a really critical spirit, and to wage war upon the vices of violence, exaggeration, and misrepresentation by which so much of the political writing of the day is marred. more

– from The Nation‘s founding prospectus, 1865

The Nation is a self described left leaning publication that was founded on July 6, 1865 by abolitionists, and is the oldest running weekly magazine in the US.  It covers topics such as Art, Politics, Music, Legal Affairs, Environmental Issues, Peace, and many others.  The magazine is primarily funded by donors called The Nation Associates whose names are listed in the end of the year issue.

The current editor of The Nation is Katrina vanden Heuvel.  She has been the editor, publisher and part owner since 1995. Notable contributors to The Nation include: Albert Einstein, John Steinbeck, who wrote the well known novels, The Grapes of Wrath and Of Mice and Men, Martin Luther King Jr., poet Langston Hughes, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Kurt Vonnegut, author of Slaughter House Five, and many others.

The Nation runs a selection of regular columns with contributors who have been writing for over 20 years.  These columns include: Diary of a Mad Law Professor, Beneath the Radar, Deadline Poet, The Nation: a cryptic crossword and others.

Some of the major topics that are being covered in The Nation today are the recent oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, the plight of welfare mothers and the effects of the recent wars on the economy.  So, if you want a leftist view of current events, The Nation is the magazine to check out.